Making Renewable Energy An Even Cheaper Alternative!

Yoel Cortes-Pena, Georgia Institute of Technology

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Fig 1. Picture of me

I’m Yoel Cortes-Pena, a chemical engineering senior student at Georgia Tech and future scientist and entrepreneur.  My research interests lie in renewable energy and environmental sustainability. Additionally, although I am an engineering student during the day, I am also part of Hip-Hop culture at night. My hobbies include dancing, beatboxing and rapping. Here is a link to my channel. 

Through this blog, I want to share with you my research experience as part of the Fort Johnson Undergraduate Summer Research Program. When I received the acceptance letter, I was surprised and happy that I would be working with Dr. Harold May in Microbial Electrosynthesis. This new technology uses microbes to fix carbon dioxide and electrons from an electrode to produce fuels and highly valued chemicals such as hydrogen, methane and acetate.

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Fig 2.Picture of Microbial Electrosynthesis Reactor. The graphite rod on the left is the cathode (electron donor) and the rod on the right is the anode (electron acceptor). The left side of the reactor is being sparged with CO2. The microbes, located on the left side of the reactor, are fixing the CO2 and producing hydrogen (visible bubbles) and acetate (dissolved in solution).

One of the many applications of microbial electrosynthesis includes the storage of energy without contributing to carbon emissions. Solar, wind and other renewable energy forms output a variable amount of energy that tends to exceed public demand, especially during off-peak hours. Consequently, this surplus electricity becomes stranded energy that cannot be used. Microbial Electrosynthesis can utilize this excess or stranded energy and store it in fuel, valorizing the use of renewable energy technology.

Acknowledgements

Dr. Harold May’s Enviromental Microbiology lab is affiliated to the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC).This project is possible thanks to funding from the NSF College of Charleston Summer REU program and the Grice Marine Laboratory. Lab space and facilities are provided by the Hollings Marine Laboratory.

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