Gracilaria: What are you hiding?

Nick Partington, St. Olaf College

Screen Shot 2018-07-03 at 10.37.44 AMThe approach: In my previous post, I discussed how we will primarily be researching differences in abundance and diversity of fish and fish species that utilize Gracilaria vermiculophylla as habitat in the Charleston harbor. In order to do so, we have been collecting several samples of fish from the two habitat types this summer. We then sort and identify fish from each sample to determine the number of individuals per species found in each habitat type, and will later carry out statistical analyses to determine if any significant differences exist between the two habitat types. Each of these steps, from collecting to identifying to analyzing, consists of techniques that must be replicated for each sample in order to ensure consistency.

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Sampling in a “sparse” patch of G. vermiculophylla

The first step is to collect the samples. We do this at Grice Cove, just a few minutes’ walk from Grice Marine Lab. On site, we have identified a section where about 20% or less of the beach is covered by G. vermiculophylla. These are the “sparse” patches. The “dense” patches are further down the beach, where about 80% or more of the beach is covered by the algae. At each site, we pull a fifteen foot seine net through about 1-2 feet of water for a distance of 15 meters. We then sort through the net, saving all of the fish and discarding plant matter and invertebrates such as crabs and shrimp. The next step is to sort and identify the specimens that we collected.

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An early stage of sample sorting. This sample includes a flounder (upper right), pipefish (upper left), and several anchovies (middle).

 

 

After being fixed in preservatives for about a week, we sort through our samples, grouping identical fish and identifying specimens to the lowest classification possible (hopefully to the species level). After the sorting and identifications are complete, the numbers of fish of each species for each sample are recorded. Later, after we have collected all of our data, we will perform statistical analyses on the data to discern any significant differences in diversity and abundance of fish that might exist between dense and sparse patches of G. vermiculophylla. Stay tuned to hear about our findings!


Special thanks to Dr. Tony Harold for his guidance in this research project. This project is funded by the National Science Foundation and is supported by the Fort Johnson REU Program, NSF DBI-1757899.

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