Zetaproteobacteria: The Journey Continues

Lauren Rodgers, Rutgers University

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Findings: This past summer, we have been working furiously with one goal in mind: measuring the concentrations of iron in the sediments around Charleston to identify if they would be a good habitat for Zetaproteobacteria. We scoured Charleston for the perfect muddy sampling sights and battled the pluff, almost losing a few boots in the process, while also gaining lots of bug bites. We then spent hours in the lab, making solutions, extracting iron, running the spectrophotometer, and collecting data.  And now, after 10 long weeks, it is coming to an end.

This summer of researching Zetaproteobacteria with Heather, Alejandra, and Sarg has taught me so many things. One of which is that science does not happen overnight. You may have an idea of how you are going to do something, but when it comes to actually carrying it out, odds are that it will not go as you think. Science is a dynamic process. You are trying things out, failing, brainstorming for other ways to do things, revising methods, and most of all learning. And this part of the process is what makes it exciting. I experienced this first hand when it came to conducting the ferrozine assay. Much of the research detailing methods for a ferrozine assay were only written for liquid samples, not for sediment samples, so we had to come up with methodology for extracting iron from the sediments. As you can imagine, this took a lot of trial and error. Trial and error such as figuring out the hard way that the water you are using to make up the solutions is actually contaminated with iron, or that glass cuvettes tend to contain their own concentrations of iron in them as well. It was frustrating at times,  but this process was so important for me because it was one of the first times that I was able to take in ideas from many different sources and develop something of my own. It was hard work, but it was all worth it in the end. We were able to collect samples, successfully extract the iron, and measure the iron concentrations, gaining some very exciting results in the end.

What’s next for Zetaproteobacteria?

Now that we have optimized the ferrozine assay for measuring the concentrations of iron in the sediments, we can continue our research on Zetaproteobacteria. The first objective that we will work towards is identifying if Zetaproteobacteria are actually present in the sediments. If they are found, we will then quantify how many Zetaproteobacteria are actually present.

If Zetaproteobacteria are found in the sediments around Charleston, it could have many implications. The first implication is that they could be affecting the local iron cycle around Charleston through their transformations of Fe(II). Zetaproteobacteria have also been shown to be able to live on solid metal and use the Fe(II) present in it, quickening the metal’s rate of rusting. If they are found in Charleston, they could be speeding up the rusting of ships or even metal pipes. Lastly, their presence in Charleston would add evidence to their potential worldwide distribution.

The project from this summer may be finished, but the Zetaproteobacteria journey has just begun!

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The Fullerton Lab Team stopping to pose while sampling at Kearns Park on the Wando River. (p.c. Heather Fullerton)


I would like to thank my mentor, Dr. Heather Fullerton, for guiding me through this research, and my Fullerton Lab members for assisting me in the field and in the lab throughout the summer. I would also like to thank the National Science Foundation for funding this research as well as the College of Charleston and Grice Marine Lab for their support.


 

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