Getting warmer…

Kaylie Anne Costa, University of Miami

IMG_6879Findings: In my previous post, I outlined how lipidomics and metabolomics would be used with mass spectrometry to study changes in the lipids and metabolites in manatee plasma in response to cold stress syndrome. The purpose of this study to provide deeper understanding how cold stress syndrome impacts Florida manatees

Our original research question was: Can changes in the lipidome and metabolome of plasma samples of Florida manatees be seen in response to CSS? Although the metabolomics data is still being processed, lipidomics has already shown promising results. Through our research we have found an interesting correlation between an

individual having a plasma Serum Amyloid A (SAA) value outside the healthy range and changes seen in their plasma lipidome. SAA is an acute phase protein produced in response to inflammation. When comparing the healthy manatee plasma samples to the CSS plasma samples with a Serum Amyloid A value greater than 50 µg/mL, we have found 81 lipids that differ significantly between plasma samples from healthy manatees and manatees with cold stress syndrome (Figure 1).

graph

Figure 1: Percentages of each lipid category out of the 81 total significant lipids that differed between CSS and healthy manatees

Our results indicate that the plasma lipidome of Florida manatees can differ as a result of cold stress syndrome. Now the next question is: what does this difference mean in context of manatees’ physiological response to cold stress syndrome?

This question is harder to answer, but we hope to be able to trace these lipids back to specific biological pathways that are altered by CSS. When the analysis of the metabolomic data is complete, we will have more pieces to the puzzle that may allow us to hone in on specific biological pathways affected by CSS that produce a change in both the lipidome and metabolome.

This pilot study will hopefully pave the way for future studies that will help protect this threatened species and conserve them as a sentinel species for studying how environmental changes will impact human health for the future.

This summer I have gained crucial research experience by using advanced techniques of analytical chemistry to address a threat to health in the marine environment. Through this REU program, I have learned about the diverse ecosystems in the Charleston area as well as the history that makes Charleston such a unique place. I would recommend the Fort Johnson REU program to any student looking for an opportunity to further their marine science education through research.

I cannot say thank you enough to my mentors Dr. John Bowden and Dr. Mike Napolitano. Their knowledge and eagerness to guide me through this process made this project possible. I would also like to thank the College of Charleston’s Grice Marine Lab for hosting the Fort Johnson REU program, National Science Foundation (NSF DBI-1757899)for funding, and our collaborators with the USGS Sirenia project for supplying the samples used in this study.

References:

Harr, K., Harvey, J., Bonde, R., Murphy, D., Lowe, M., Menchaca, M., … & Francis-Floyd, R. (2006). Comparison of methods used to diagnose generalized inflammatory disease in manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris). Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine37(2), 151-159.

 

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