Counting Corals

Jordan Penn, Millersville University

The Approach: In my last post, I discussed that the consequences of habitat-degrading practices (e.g., bottom trawling, dumping of waste, drilling) include the loss of species such as gorgonian corals, which provide structural habitat for other species.

My research seeks to understand the relationship between soft corals and their geological substrate. In other words, our lab want to understand whether or not soft corals are more likely to be present on rocky or sandy sea floors. We are also looking for relationships between the abundance of soft corals at different depths. We are investigating these relationships in order to gain some understanding of where soft corals are most likely to be found. 

Example of a transect with three segments. Image credit: Science X.

In order to assess these potential relationships, first we need to divide the video footage of dives from the ROV (remotely-operated vehicle) Beagle into 15-minute transects containing 3 5-minute segments. We take this step in order to determine the density (number of individuals per square meter of area) of corals at each site as accurately as possible.

Next, I will analyze the video footage, counting each Leptogorgia, Acanthogorgia, Eugorgia, Adelogorgia, and sea pen (these are good model organisms because they are conspicuous in our study site). Along with the number of corals, I will denote the type of substrate that was dominant throughout the 5-minute segment (e.g., rocky bottom, sandy bottom, mixed/coarse bottom).

Finally, I will be able to run statistical analyses on these data to determine average density, the average deviation from the determined average density, and potential drivers of diversity at each site (e.g., does depth/bottom type/something else affect how many corals are present in an area?).


Thank you to the members of the Etnoyer Lab for their guidance and assistance as well as the Grice Lab and College of Charleston for funding this project. This project is supported by the Fort Johnson REU Program, NSF DBI-1757899.


References

NOAA. (2012, April 17). NOAA releases new views of Earth’s ocean floor. Retrieved June 17, 2019, from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-noaa-views-earth-ocean-floor.html NOAA

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