Catch of the Day(s)

Melanie Herrera, University of Maryland College Park

South Carolina is known for its iconic southern cuisine, including a staple of fresh seafood which fuels the buckets of shrimp & grits and “catch of the day”. In order to support this huge industry (and fill the bellies of every South Carolinian), I am conducting an experiment to figure out where this seafood is holing up prior to its demise. Dr. Harold, his graduate student, Mary Ann McBrayer, and I are out on Grice Beach collecting fishes, crabs, shrimps, and much more in order to figure what exactly is there… And what they are using to survive.

Using a seine net, we encircle marine animals in dense and sparse patches of an invasive sea grass, Gracilaria, for collection. We hypothesize that Gracilaria is helping the local economy (a surprising contribution from an invasive species) by creating refuge for young animals. On the beach, we submerge separate samples of animals (from dense versus sparse areas of Gracilaria) into a euthanizing solution to bring them up to the lab for preservation and analysis (Figure 1).

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Figure 1: An example of animals caught in separate habitats at Grice Cove. The left exhibits animals caught in a dense area of Gracilaria and the right exhibits animals caught from a sparse area of Gracialaria. Credit: Melanie Herrera

In the lab, separate samples (dense versus sparse) undergo a few transfers into different fixatives (10% seawater formalin, 25% isopropyl, and 50% isopropyl consecutively) to keep the fish from decaying. After this preserving process, fish and other animals are separated and categorized by family, genus, and species. This categorization enables us to identify and analyze what types of animals and how many of each are using different habitat. Our analysis will give us insight on what type of habitat, either patches dominated by Gracilaria or areas with more open water, benefits fish. Specifically, we will be able to identify if Gracilaria is more advantageous to young fish or if their survivorship is independent from their habitat.

So far, we have collected lots of pipefish, narrow skinny fish that resemble a hair strand-size snake, Atlantic Silversides, a fish that looks exactly like it sounds, and more shrimp than anyone needs (Figure 2). Although some of these animals do not directly contribute to the seafood industry, its presence in the Charleston Harbor can tell us a lot of things. For example, we have seen some fishes that usually stay in warmer waters in the Southern U.S. Their expanding habitat can lead us to some more hypotheses on climate change and warm weather moving northward. In addition, we can find out if Gracilaria has a stake in rearing economically important fish in the future.

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Figure 2: (From left to right) Pipefish, Atlantic Silversides, and Grass Shrimp caught for analysis.Credit: Melanie Herrera

Thank you so much to my mentor Dr. Tony Harold and his lab for his advice and guidance. Thank you to Mary Ann McBrayer for helping me facilitate this project. This research is funded through the National Science Foundation and College of Charleston’s Grice Marine Lab.

 

The real beauty of coral reefs

Nina Sarmiento, Binghamton University

The beauty of a coral reef is undeniable. Over four thousand species of fish, 800 species of coral, invertebrates, and large macro fauna coming together in one place is sure to create a thrilling visual experience. You might be surprised to learn that these remarkable places filled with twenty five percent of marine life, constitute less than one percent of the ocean floor.1 But you don’t have to be lucky enough to travel to a coral reef to fully appreciate its beauty. The real value of reefs comes from their unsuspecting roles in sustaining life as we know it.

photo cred: fmap.ca

photo cred: fmap.ca

Fish from approximately half of our global fisheries, at one point spent a part of their life in coral reefs.2 The unique habitat hard corals provide is perfect for spawning and juvenile life for many species, which may later end up in other parts of the ocean. Fishermen make their livelihood from these reefs, harvesting an average of fifteen tons of seafood annually per square kilometer.3

As for people living on our tropical coastlines, reefs play a crucial role in protecting life on land. It is in the beauty of the long braches of Copra palmata, among other corals, that dangerous storms and waves are softened. Corals roughness and their shallow locale dissipate wave energy, and we have a natural barrier that safeguards our homes.4

Acropora palmata – “Elkhorn coral” Photo cred: coral.aims.gov.au

Acropora palmata – “Elkhorn coral”
Photo cred: coral.aims.gov.au

The importance and intrigue of coral reefs has led to studying many of the organisms and interactions there, leading to new understandings of many aspects of organism biology and evolution. Additionally research has uncovered new medicine from extracting compounds unique species have, giving reefs an importance in future medical interests.

The paradox is that, of all the reasons why we appreciate coral reefs, it is we, the human species that are not having a good effect on them. In fact we are seeing reef decline in many parts of the world because of our actions.5

This summer I am delving into studying one of the possible reasons for this decline; a chemical threat to coral that may not be obvious at first, but could have significant implications on their ability to survive and reproduce.

Stay tuned to hear about my project and the amazing opportunity I have to be a part of the effort to preserve these beautiful communities.

References:

1 Spalding MD, Ravilious C, Green EP. 2001. United Nations Environment Programme, World Conservation Monitoring Centre. World Atlas of Coral Reefs. University California Press: Berkley. 416.

2 US Coral Reef Task force. 2000. The National Action Plan to Conserve Coral Reefs. Washington DC: US Environmental Protection Agency. 34.

3 Ceasr H. 1996. Economic Analysis of Indonesian Coral Reefs. Washington DC: The World Bank.

4 Lowe JR, Falter JL, Bandet MD, Pawlak G, Atkinson MJ, Momismith SG, Koseff JR. 2005. Spectral wave dissipation over a barrier reef. Journal of Geophysical research. 10: C04001.

5 Nystrom M, Folke C, Moberg F. 2015. Coral reef disturbance and resilience in a human-dominated environment.

Funding for my research comes from the National Science Foundation in partner with The College of Charleston and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

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