One Fish, Two Fish…

Ana Silverio, The University of Texas at Austin

The Approach: In my previous post, I explained how important small fishes are to the food web and how their new found interaction with Gracilaria vermiculophylla came about. Now, measuring something such as diversity and abundance may sound confusing but it’s as simple as one, two, three!

Abundance is the number of individuals per species in an ecosystem and relative abundance is the overall evenness of those individuals. Diversity is more of a measurement of variation or how many different species are counted in a designated area/habitat.

Fine mesh seine net being dragged over the 15-meter transect to capture our fish.
Photo Credit: Norma Salcedo

Now that we understand what we are measuring… what’s next? As mentioned before, the Charleston harbor has been introduced with an invasive species of seaweed, but it has served as a home for the juvenile fish. To measure diversity and abundance we have to take samples from two different sites affected by this invasive species. Luckily, it’s a short stroll over to Grice Beach behind our marine lab to find a section of Gracilaria with 20% coverage for our sparse site and one with 80% coverage for our dense site. After establishing our sample sites, we take a 15-meter transect which we will pull our fine-mesh seine net through at about knee-deep water. We quickly but gently pull the net up to the beach and start sorting through our samples placing the fish in a half-gallon jar while discarding any invertebrates. We repeat this at our second site and voilà we have our samples!

Initial sorting process for our samples
Photo Credit: Norma Salcedo

Are we done yet? Of course not! Once we collect both of our samples from the different patches of Gracilaria, we take them back to the lab to set in preservatives for about a week and begin the sorting process. While we sort each jar, we try to identify each fish down to the lowest classification if possible (in a perfect world we would have all of our critters down to species). After identification is complete, we start our measurements of diversity and abundance by counting our fish. When we are finished counting, we organize our data and use statistical analyses to see if there is a significant difference in diversity and abundance in our two sample sites. We have followed procedures from the past two summers and each time we have sampled this summer to make sure we can compare our data at the end.

And now for the big reveal… Drumroll please! Will we find a difference in diversity? In abundance? In neither or both? Will we finally win a battle against the dreadful pluff mud? Although the last part seems unfortunately unlikely, join me next time to finally find out what secrets Gracilaria has tangled up in the Charleston Harbor!


Special thanks to my mentor, Dr. Harold for his support and guidance throughout this project. Also, to Dr. Podolsky and Grice Marine Lab for giving me the opportunity to conduct this research. This project is supported by the Fort Johnson REU program, NSF DBI-1757899.

Some Dramatic Microorganisms and Targeted Genetic Analysis

Emily Spiegel, Bryn Mawr College

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Genetic analysis has become the name of the game in many fields of biological research. Genes encode proteins, and in biology, proteins are king. Proteins guide biological pathways throughout the entire organism, so if you can track the genes, you can understand how the animal functions. Advances in technology like CRISPR, RNA sequencing, and PCR have improved the accessibility and accuracy of high-level genetic analysis in laboratories across the world. Some scientists utilize this technology to study the entire genome of an organism, while others attempt to understand the response of specific genes to various environmental factors or other external influences. This summer, I’m conducting an experiment focused on the latter. I’ll be studying how the polar algae species, Fragilariopsis cylindrus (affectionately known as Frag) copes with environmental stress by reproducing sexually. To do so, I’ll use targeted RNA sequencing to track genes related to sexual reproduction.

In order to understand how a Frag, responds to environmental stresses, you need a lot of algae. I reared nearly 100 liters of this algae in different artificial conditions. These conditions varied by two factors: photoperiod (the length of day and night), and nutrient levels. If you missed my previous post, “Stressing Out My Algae,” you should check it out for more details on the background for this experiment. We suspect that in conditions of stressful light energy (24 hours of continuous light), Frag will respond by reproducing sexually as opposed to its normal asexual mode of reproduction. This could possibly be a mechanism to rid itself of excess energy in times of stress, since sexual reproduction is more energetically expensive than asexual reproduction. By reproducing sexually, Frag may improve its chances of survival against this stress. Compounded with this is our hypothesis on nutrient deprivation. Previous experiments have shown that when a major nutrient, nitrogen, is limited, the algae cannot grow at full capacity and sexual reproduction is inhibited. We predict that when the stress of nitrogen limitation is combined with the stress of high light energy, we’ll see a reduction in the algae’s ability to survive in the stressful conditions due to the inhibition of sexual reproduction. So if we stress out the Frag enough and take away their ability to have sex, they’ll probably die. They’re some very dramatic microorganisms.

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24 bottles of algae were grown in six different experimental conditions varied by length of light exposure and nutrient levels. Algae was reared in 4-liter bottles filled with seawater.

So we grew our Frag, four bottles per six experimental conditions. Every day for eight days we extracted biomass from the bottle. From this sample we could test chlorophyll levels and cell counts, both of which give us a good idea of how well the algae in that bottle are growing in their conditions. We also took samples to be used for RNA extraction. Remember how genes encode proteins and proteins are king? Well before you can have your protein product, you need RNA. You’ve probably heard of DNA, which is the double stranded genetic cookbook. RNA is its single stranded offspring, which is then used as a the direct template to make proteins. A lot of genetic analysis therefore looks at RNA instead of DNA in order to understand how genes are being transcribed for protein production. We’re currently working on extracting the RNA from the original biomass sample and then running that pure RNA through a specialized machine called Nanostring. This is extremely targeted analysis, as Nanostring focuses in on the specific RNA we’re most interested in. In this case, we’re interested in RNA which is encoded from genes related to sexual reproduction. Using Nanostring will tell us how active the genes for sexual reproduction are in each bottle, which we can analyze to derive any correlation between our environmental stress factors and sexual reproduction.

If our hypothesis is correct, then we’ll see the greatest expression of sexual reproduction genes in the conditions of high light energy (24 hours of continuous light). We’d expect to also see low growth performance in nitrogen limited populations, indicated by low cell counts and chlorophyll levels. In these populations we predict we’ll see little if any expression of genes related to sexual reproduction. By the end, we’ll hopefully have a clearer picture of how phytoplankton like Frag deal with environmental stress.

Funding for this project is provided by the National Science Foundation in collaboration with the College of Charleston Grice Marine Laboratory and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Acknowledgements to the entire lab of Dr. Ditullio and Dr. Lee in the Hollings Marine Laboratory facility.